Ukrainian exchange student learns soccer and heads to Iowa state title game

The Waco Warriors are mostly local small town boys, but number 32 stands out. His friends call him Odie. He’s just one of those kids you love to coach as a senior coach, he’s only been a resident of Iowa for two years. His home country is Ukraine when I was 12, I just had a damn dream to come to America and actually New York and I found an exchange program. I just decided to give it a try and somehow ended up in Wayland Iowa. My first reaction was that I was confused and didn’t know what Wayland Iowa was. I mean I’ve never heard of it. Stefan Chuck, whose turn it was, didn’t take long to get used to Wayland, people were great, great community. Everyone is very friendly. He’s got a hell of a background in basketball, but some of his new friends introduced him to football. I knew American football. I just knew that’s how Thing and people play in America and I wanted to try it, but I had no idea about the rules and the game in general and I didn’t play much offense, just defense. And the first thing they told me was just go get the ball. Od quickly got the hang of it. He’s still learning some rules, but it helped that he earned £35 between his junior and senior years. They don’t see kids just being drawn to contact the way Cody is. If he hits you, you know he hits you, he wants to be very physical and he still doesn’t know the game while he gets *** punishment for anything and we’re going to say something to him. And I didn’t know the undefeated Warriors were playing in Thursday’s eight-man title game, which is a ***big reason they got there after a ***stunning interception in the semifinals. It is wonderful. It feels great. You feel a hell of a lot of support from people, parents, just about everyone. I mean kids are coming out of high school, we have a great undergraduate department, *** lots of supporters are loud and it really helps that he wants to focus on football but the war in his home country has forced his family to split up a part. He originally wanted to come home after his junior year but he stayed after the war broke out, once I turned 18 there would be a damn chance for me to be drafted into the military and I don’t want that to happen. Dodi’s father is out of the country for work and if you were to come home the adult male lockdown would not allow him to leave again. I try not to follow him at all because it just drains my energy and my parents just let me follow all the big things that have happened and like all the success and he says he doesn’t want to focus on the war , but to be *** 17 years old and *** soccer player. On Thursday he gets an unbelievable chance. I can’t wait to just play a chance of a damn life. Not very many understand that. And everyone on the team is ready to let their hearts out and just put it all out there and report it in Wayland, Jack KCR GTV nine Sports.

“Just get the ball”: Ukrainian exchange student learns soccer and is on his way to the title game in the state of Iowa

The WACO Warriors are mostly local small town boys. But not Oleh “Odee” Shtefanchuk, who hails from Chernivtsi, Ukraine, reports KCRG. “It started when I was 12, I just had this dream of coming to America. New York, actually,” Odee admitted. “I didn’t know what Wayland, Iowa was. I’d never heard of it.” Odee, who is described as outgoing, didn’t take long to adjust to Wayland. “People have been great, great community,” he said. “Everyone’s really friendly.” He comes from a basketball background, but some of his new friends introduced him to soccer, reports KCRG. “I knew American football,” he said. “I wanted to try, but I had no idea about the rules or the game in general. I didn’t play much offense, just played defense, and the first thing they told me was, ‘Just go for the ball.’” Odee got the hang of it quickly, he’s still learning some rules, but it helped that he gained 35 pounds between his junior and senior years. “You don’t see kids like Odee being drawn to the contact when he hits you, you know he hits you,” said WACO head coach Chad Edeker. “And he still doesn’t know the game. Every once in a while he gets a penalty and we tell him something and he’s like, ‘Well, I didn’t know that.’” The undefeated Warriors play the 8-player title game on Thursday. “It’s incredible. It feels great; They feel a lot of support from people, from parents, from everyone,” Odee said. “We have a great student department.” He wants to concentrate on football, but the war in his homeland has forced his family to separate. He originally intended to come home after his junior year, but stayed after the war broke out. “As soon as I turn 18 I would have a chance to be drafted into the military and I don’t want that to happen,” Odee said. Odee’s father is out of the country for work and if he were to come home, a grown male lockdown would not allow him to leave again. “I try not to follow that at all. because it drains my energy and my parents follow me for all the big things that are happening.” Odee says he doesn’t want to focus on the war, but on being a 17-year-old and a soccer player. On Thursday he gets an unbelievable chance. “I can’t wait to play. Just a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Odee. “Everyone on the team is willing to let their hearts out and put it all out there.”

The WACO Warriors are mostly small town boys.

But not Oleh “Odee” Shtefanchuk, who hails from Chernivtsi, Ukraine, reports KCRG.

“It started when I was 12, I just had this dream of coming to America. New York, actually,” Odee admitted. “I didn’t know what Wayland, Iowa was. I had never heard of it.”

Odee, who is described as outgoing, didn’t take long to adjust to Wayland.

“People have been great, great community,” he said. “Everyone is very friendly.”

He comes from a basketball background, but some of his new friends introduced him to soccer, reports KCRG.

“I knew American football,” he said. “I wanted to try, but I had no idea about the rules or the game in general. I didn’t play much offense, just played defense, and the first thing they said to me was, ‘Just go for the ball.'”

Odee got the hang of it quickly, he’s still learning some rules, but it helped that he gained 35 pounds between his junior and senior years.

“You don’t see kids like Odee being drawn to the contact when he hits you, you know he hits you,” said WACO head coach Chad Edeker. “And he still doesn’t know the game. Every once in a while he gets a penalty and we tell him something and he’s like, ‘Well, I didn’t know that.’”

The undefeated Warriors play Thursday’s 8-man title game.

“It’s wonderful. It feels great; you feel a lot of support from the people, from the parents, from everyone,” said Odee. “We have a great student department.”

He wants to focus on football, but the war in his homeland has forced his family to separate. He originally wanted to come home after his junior year, but he stayed after the war broke out.

“As soon as I turn 18, I would have a chance to be drafted into the military, and I don’t want that,” Odee said.

Odee’s father is out of the country for work, and if he did come home, a grown male lockdown would not allow him to leave again.

“I try not to follow him at all because it just drains my energy and my parents just follow me in all the big things that are happening.”

Odee says he doesn’t want to focus on the war but on being a 17-year-old and a football player. On Thursday he gets an unbelievable chance.

“I can’t wait to play. Just a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Odee. “Everyone on the team is willing to let their hearts out and put it all out there.”

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