Uber for EMS, Irsreali-modeled program being tested in Iowa

Call it Uber for EMS – at least that’s what Lt. gov. Adam Gregg. A pilot program in Iowa will give two emergency services providers $50,000 each to use an app to notify nearby first responders so they can quickly respond to an emergency before an ambulance can arrive. Vendors can now apply for the grant and must match it with $25,000 of their own money. “Hopefully we have a few communities that can use the technology to really reduce response time,” Gov. Kim Reynolds said in a one-on-one interview with Chief Political Reporter Amanda Rooker last week. “It resembles a model that the Lieutenant Governor saw when he made a trade trip to Israel.” That Israeli group, United Hatzalah, reduced response times in Jerusalem and presented their model to the Iowa Association of Counties last summer. In Israel, the program pings a nearby first responder’s app to an emergency, and that person rides a moped to help before an ambulance can arrive. Interested parties listened to an informational webinar Monday morning with the Iowa Economic Development Authority, which will select and provide grants under the Empower Rural Iowa program. Further webinars will take place until February. A preliminary application must be submitted by March 1st and a final application must be submitted by May 1st. Local governments, for-profit corporations, and nonprofit organizations can all apply for the critical window of time between the onset of an emergency and the arrival of traditional ambulances,” said Lisel Seabert, program manager for rural community revitalization at the Iowa EDA. In addition to reducing response times, the pilot program plans to to add more volunteer first responders that might not be traditional, including veterans, members of the National Guard, local medics, etc. “Just think of the big players in your area and they might be willing to contribute to this effort,” Seabert said , who led the information program on Monday.”If it’s successful and it actually works, we can build on that and expand it across the state as well,” Reynolds said AED have the program . The $50,000 grant will help fund these go-bags, training, staff time and recruitment. The technology is free for the first pilot year, providers can choose from four different apps. For the past nine months, KCCI Investigates has exposed the state’s problems with emergency services through a series, Essential: Iowa’s EMS Emergency. Some of those problems include staff shortages, department closures, and people calling 911 just so no one shows up.

Call it Uber for EMS – at least that’s what Lt. gov. Adam Gregg.

A pilot program in Iowa will give two emergency services providers $50,000 each to use an app to notify nearby first responders so they can quickly respond to an emergency before an ambulance can arrive. Vendors can now apply for the grant and must match it with $25,000 of their own money.

“Hopefully we have a few communities that can use the technology to really reduce response time,” Gov. Kim Reynolds said in a one-on-one interview with Chief Political Reporter Amanda Rooker last week. “It resembles a model the Lt. Governor saw when he made a trade trip to Israel.”

This Israeli group, United Hatzalah, reduced response times in Jerusalem and presented their model to the Iowa Association of Counties last summer. In Israel, the program pings a nearby first responder’s app to an emergency, and that person rides a moped to help before an ambulance can arrive.

Interested parties listened to an informational webinar Monday morning with the Iowa Economic Development Authority, which will select and provide grants under the Empower Rural Iowa program. Further webinars will take place until February. A preliminary application must be submitted by March 1st and a final application by May 1st. Local governments, for-profit companies and non-profit organizations can apply.

“We’re trying to provide immediate medical assistance during this really critical window of time between the onset of an emergency and the arrival of traditional ambulances,” said Lisel Seabert, program manager for rural community revitalization at the Iowa EDA.

In addition to reducing response times, the pilot program plans to add more volunteer first responders who might not be traditional, including veterans, members of the National Guard, local medics and more.

“Just think of the big players in your area and they might be willing to contribute to this effort,” said Seabert, who led Monday’s information program.

“If it’s successful and it actually works, we can build on that and expand it across the state as well,” Reynolds said.

First responders have “go-bags” of emergency medical supplies and, according to the program, are required to have an AED. The $50,000 grant will help fund these go-bags, training, staff time and recruitment. The technology is free of charge in the first pilot year, providers can choose from four different apps.

For the past nine months, KCCI Investigates has exposed the state’s problems with emergency services through a series, Essential: Iowa’s EMS Emergency. Some of those problems include staff shortages, department closures, and people calling 911 just so no one shows up.

Source