The Iowa Department of Health provides schools with free naloxone

A FUND IS ESTABLISHED TO HELP THE FAMILY. ALSO IOWA SCHOOLS ACROSS THE STATE STOCK THE LOCKS ON THE REVERSE DRUGS FOR THE OVERDOSE. IT IS PART OF AN EXPAND STATE PROGRAM TO COMBAT A SURGE. OPIOID DEATHS. IOWA SAW 258 OF THEM IN THE LAST YEAR. THAT’S COMPARED TO 230 IN 2020. 157 IN 2019. THE IOWA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PROVIDES FREE NALOXONE NOSE KITS TO SCHOOLS. A WESTERN IOWA COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT SAYS THERE HAS NO NEED IN SCHOOLS YET, BUT IT’S BETTER TO BE SURE. WE HAVE IT. AND IF WE DON’T NEED IT, TOO. I HOPE WE NEVER HAVE TO USE IT BUT I HAVE BEEN TRAINING FOR 35 YEARS. I’VE NEVER BEEN IN ONE OR WE USE A TOOL BUT WE ALWAYS HAVE IT JUST IN CASE. NOW THE PROGRAM FUNDED BY A TWO-YEAR $18 MILLION GRANT SCHOOL DISTRICTS THAT SHOULD BE INTERESTED IN MAINTAINING THE CHILDREN

Health Department is providing schools in Iowa with free naloxone

Schools across Iowa are stocking up on naloxone — the drug used to reverse opioid overdose. It’s part of a growing government program to combat a surge in opioid-related deaths. Iowa had 258 opioid-related deaths last year, compared to 213 in 2020 and 157 in 2019. The Iowa Department of Health and Human Services provides schools with free naloxone nasal spray kits. The Keota Community School District in western Iowa said there hasn’t been a need in their schools so far, but it’s better to be safe than sorry, sorry. “We have it, and if we don’t need it, that’s fine. I hope we never have to use it,” an official said. The program is funded by a two-year, $18 million grant. School districts interested in receiving the kits should apply to the Iowa Department of Health and Human Services.

Schools across Iowa are stocking up on naloxone — the drug used to reverse opioid overdose.

It’s part of an expanding government program to combat a surge in opioid-related deaths.

Iowa had 258 opioid-related deaths last year, compared to 213 in 2020 and 157 in 2019.

The Iowa Department of Health and Human Services provides schools with free naloxone nasal spray kits.

The Keota Community School District in western Iowa said there hasn’t been a need in their schools so far, but it’s better to be safe than sorry.

“We have it, and if we don’t need it, that’s fine. I hope we never have to use it,” an official said.

The program is funded by a two-year, $18 million grant.

School districts interested in receiving the kits should apply to the Iowa Department of Health and Human Services.

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